Surfing in Morocco

Natural Pointbreak Paradise
Natural Pointbreak Paradise
From the high altitudes of the Atlas Mountains to the shifting dunes of the Sahara Desert, Morocco has as many facets as it has waves. With the North Atlantic wave generator being quite a distance away, it is usually clean, long period swells that make their way to some of the best quality pointbreaks in the world. So it is no surprise that this country of couscous and camels, of mosques and mint tea has for long been on the itinerary of surfers making their way south as the northern hemisphere winter kicks in.

Surfspots in Morocco

Best surf spots to learn to surf​ in Morocco

Northern Morocco

From Tangier to the capital of Rabat and on to El Jadida there are countless, empty waves waiting to be discovered with many of them not even mapped yet. This also means a rather rudimentary infrastructure for beginners in terms of surf schools and camps, that are predominantly located on the central Moroccan coastline. However, lessons can be had at the city beaches of Rabat and Casablanca. Apart from that, Plage des Nations is just one example of a large and consistent beachbreak north of Rabat that works year-round and on all tides.

Central Morocco

Safi has an own surf club and you can learn to surf at the city beach north of the harbor. Further south there is the hippie-town of Essaouira that Jimmy Hendrix tried to buy in the 1960’s. Its main beach is great to learn surfing and also popular with kite surfers when the wind is on. Most of the surf camps and schools in Morocco concentrate around the villages of Taghazout and Tamraght which are about an hour’s drive away from Agadir’s airport Al Massira. Taghazout has a long beach extending all the way south to Tamraght. It usually has a wave from autumn to spring but sees flat spells during the summer months due to its WSW exposure. In that case heading north to the beautiful beach of Tamri will help which will always have a wave. In Tamraght go to the beach of Devil’s rock for mellow waves and relaxed vibes. Just around the headland to the south there is Banana Point with a small, beginner-friendly beach break protected from north winds. If you are comfortable standing up then the point itself at times offers long easy righthanders definitely worth trying. Agadir also has a large beach with waves getting bigger towards its southern end.

Southern Morocco

Fully exposed the North Atlantic’s swell cradle and extending for more than a thousand kilometers right into the Sahara desert, the coastline south of Agadir picks up all available swell and therefore can be a good choice for the summer months. Sidi Ifni about 200 km south of Agadir has a number of beachbreaks nearby that are great for learning and accommodation is cheap and easy. For the rest, the south of Morocco to a large extent remains unexplored and is a wild place to discover for fully prepared adventurers.

Isn’t Morocco what you are looking for? Try surfing in Spain. Or try surfing in France. You can always also go and surf in Portugal

Best surf spots for advanced surfers​ in Morocco

Northern Morocco

Dar Bouazza south of Casablanca is the most famous one of a few lefts in the country and needs a decent swell to wrap around the point. It breaks over sharp rocks with urchins and at low tide can connect to the outside section called L’Inter for long, smooth rides. South winds are best. Oued Cherrat is a swell magnet north of Casablanca with a sand-covered reef that tolerates some onshore wind from the west. It works on all tides and gets quite busy.

Central Morocco

The pointbreak at the small fishing village of Immesouane delivers endless dreamy rights that make you forget about gravity. The inside is a good spot for learning and you can also find a surf school and rentals in the village. At the other side of the point there’s a west facing beachbreak for the rare occasion when it’s too small for the waves to get around the harbor. South of Tamri at Cap Rhir, Boilers is a super-consistent, powerful, experts-only righthand pointbreak with fast vertical walls. Following the coastal road towards Taghazout will take you to its most consistent break that is Killer Point. It sucks up all available swell and is always bigger than it looks from shore. Morocco’s most famous wave is Anka Point, again a bit further down the road. It needs a solid swell to live up to its full potential but when it does, you may surf the wave of your life. Hash Point is located right in the village of Taghazout and apparently named after surfers who smoke so much that they can’t be bothered walking all the way to Anka Point.

Southern Morocco

This is where crowds become a fading memory and the waves get bigger as this part of Africa’s coastline becomes more exposed to the swells arriving from northerly directions. Mirleft is a tiny coastal resort with cheap accommodation and several beaches that reportedly hold waves up to 4 meters. There is also a rivermouth worth checking. South of Sidi Ifni, surfing becomes a 4×4 adventure.

When to go,

weather, temperature, wave, crowd
wise?

 1 = Not to good
2 = Ok
3 = Good
4= Very good
5 = Very, very good

Click on a label & discover your perfect period to go 🏄

Tips & info about Morocco

Best airports to fly to

✈️ Agadir
✈️ Marrakesh
✈️ Casablanca

Average Prices

  • Beer

    In a bar

    €3,50
  • Espresso

    In a café

    €0,80
  • New shortboard

    In a surfshop.

    €450

Nice video about Morocco

Brought to you with ♡ and local knowledge​

Author

Name : Rudi
Surf experience : 14 years
Hi I’m Rudi, passionate surfer and photographer. I work as a surf coach, lifeguard trainer, writer and translator.

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